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How might the surface landscape above a laccolith look? it would look like an uplift or dome because the laccolith below is a lens-shaped mass of magma that pushes the rock above it upward. it would look like a thin, horizontal band because it was formed with magma that had a high viscosity. it would look like a depression or bowl because the laccolith below is a sheet-like structure from a centimeter up to a kilometer in thickness.

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It would look like a rise or dome because the laccolith below is a lens – shaped mass of magma that pushes the rock above it upwards.

Explanation:

The laccolith is formed by volcanic activity. Not all the magma is contracted in the volcano and comes out of or solidifies there. Some of the magma actually moves underground in the surrounding area, using the cracks as pathways. When this magma cools deep underground it creates a disturbance.

One such intrusion is the laccolith. The laccolith can be described as a lens shape, or look like a mushroom. The laccolith is intruded which pushes the crust upwards, so the surface above rises a dome that extends out into its surroundings.

The laccolith may eventually come to the surface due to the weather and corrosion, but for that to happen it usually takes millions of years.